serial killer news more topics
   
2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000  
   
  BASELINE Killer ... ... US ... ... ... 6+
aka ... ... Phoenix AZ
... : ... ... ... ...
Verdict/Urteil:
 
Serial Killer
 
...

20070317: Alleged Ariz. Killer To Face Death Penalty AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News
A prosecutor in Arizona's Maricopa County says the prosecution will seek the death penalty in suspected serial killer Mark Goudeau's upcoming trial.

The 42-year-old man is set to face a 74 counts when his trial starts, and Maricopa County Attorney Andrew Thomas announced Friday that the prosecution would seek the death penalty in the case, the Arizona Republic reported.

A separate trial against Goudeau in which he is accused of sexually assaulting two sisters is set to begin in June.

Goudeau could become Phoenix's most prolific serial killer if convicted on all murder charges against him.

He is facing charges of killing nine people in addition to rape and robbery charges in the prosecution's main case against him.

Thomas told the Republic he wants the main trial against Goudeau to begin soon, but a recent backlog of capital cases in Arizona may push the trial date far beyond one year from now.

 

 

20070316: Death Penalty Sought in Serial Case AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News
A prosecutor said Friday he will seek the death penalty against a man accused of being the Baseline Killer, a serial predator who terrorized residents here for more than a year.

Mark Goudeau, 42, is charged with 94 crimes in all, including nine counts of first-degree murder, 15 counts of sexual assault and 11 counts of kidnapping. Goudeau has pleaded not guilty.

Maricopa County Attorney Andrew Thomas said he concluded the death penalty was an appropriate sentence and cited aggravating circumstances, including multiple killings and crimes carried out in a cruel manner.

"Based on the facts of this case and the legal principles that govern capital cases, I have concluded it is appropriate to seek a capital sentence for this defendant," Thomas said at a news conference.

A call to Goudeau's lawyer was not immediately returned.

Goudeau, a former construction worker, is suspected of starting to prey on people at random after he was released from prison in 2004 on armed robbery, kidnapping and aggravated assault convictions.

Police say the killer usually struck at night and wore disguises, including a wig of dreadlocks. The name Baseline Killer came from the Phoenix street where some of the earliest crimes were committed.

Police arrested Goudeau in September on suspicion of two sexual assaults in 2005 and indicted him this month on the other charges.

The Baseline Killer was one of two serial killer cases in the Phoenix area recently.

In August, police arrested two men in the Serial Shooter case who are accused of driving around the area at night, firing at people randomly. Seven people were killed. The defendants have pleaded not guilty.

 

 

20070222: Former local man honored for role in catching Valley's serial shooters AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News
A former local man who is now a Scottsdale police detective has been honored for his role in the apprehension of two men this summer in a series of random shootings and slayings in the Valley. It was one of the largest police investigations ever in the state of Arizona.

 

Pete Salazar, 38, was named Scottsdale's "Special Assignment Officer of the Year" and received the award in a ceremony Feb. 10.

Phoenix received national attention last year as these shootings, plus the crimes of another suspect known as the "Baseline killer," held the metro area in a state of fear. A man believed to be the Baseline killer is also behind bars.

But as officers closed in on the two roommates suspected of being the "Serial Shooters," Salazar said the feeling for him was no different than in other cases that weren't as high profile.

"At the time, it was no different than other homicide investigations I've been part of." He said he had worked long hours, including overnight and into the next day, on other occasions to make a strong case.

But this time, he was one of the primary case agents on a task force of 150 investigators. "I try to tell people I was a small cog in a very big wheel," Salazar said.

Several police agencies lent manpower to the Serial Shooter Task Force. "The biggest part for me was to just be a part of this," Salazar said. Despite the group's size it worked well, he said. "We had a lot of good direction and a lot of good supervisors. Everyone worked together for the common goal. Things went very smooth, considering the size and the scope of the investigation."

The suspects, Dale Hausner and Samuel Dieteman, face a 35-count indictment as a result of the rampage. Investigators believe the roommates were responsible for six murders and at least 29 other drive-by shootings of random pedestrians in the Valley, although the investigation continues.

The sergeant who nominated Salazar for the award wrote that Salazar and a fellow Scottsdale detective worked around the lock for 48 hours with little or no sleep to interrogate the suspects and secure other evidence.

"The interrogations were extremely long and arduous but Detective Salazar was able to obtain a confession from the suspect responsible for killing the young 20-year-old woman walking home from work," Sgt. Don Bellendier wrote in the nomination.

The slaying referred to occurred just after 10 p.m. on May 2, 2006, near the intersection of 61st Place and Thomas Road in Scottsdale. It was the first known shotgun slaying the suspects are believed to have committed.

"We had the first homicide ... which we linked to the Phoenix cases. That's when the task force evolved," Salazar said this week in a telephone interview from his office.

Bellendier's nomination continued, "It is greater than a once-in-a-lifetime chance to be involved in a serial killer investigation and just as great a chance to actually obtain a confession from a serial killer.

"Detective Salazar then had to organize mounds of paperwork and evidence in order to present the case to a grand jury and the County Attorney's office, an effort that would take weeks, not days."

The arrests were made on August 4. Salazar said the suspects were identified and placed under 24-hour surveillance on Aug. 1. Police were attempting to gather as much evidence as possible. The arrests were made when "public safety outweighed the need for more information," Salazar said.

Salazar and others kept working almost nonstop into Aug. 6 to bring all the evidence together and complete the interviews.

Salazar is a 1987 graduate of Florence High School, where he played football and baseball. He worked for Arizona State Prison and graduated from University of Arizona in 1994 with a Bachelor of Science degree in criminal justice studies. He has been with the Scottsdale police force since 1995. He is the son of Carol Salazar of Florence and the late Pete Salazar Jr.

 

20070207: Wife of accused serial killer creates Web site to protest arrest AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News

The wife of an accused serial killer has created a Web site in which she berates police as well as the Maricopa County Attorney's Office for his arrest.

Wendy Carr also cites recent sexual assaults in Chandler as proof that the Baseline Killer is still out there.Carr's husband, Mark Goudeau, was arrested in September and faces 94 charges including nine counts of first-degree murder.Goudeau, 42, will go to trial June 25 in the sexual assaults of two sisters at a park in southwest Phoenix but it remains unclear when he would face trial on the murder charges.The Baseline Killer crime spree had residents and police on edge as a predator in disguise committed rapes, robberies and slayings from August 2005 to June 2006.Carr claims the crimes committed by the Baseline Killer have not stopped and points to news articles that detail sexual assaults in Chandler and killings in Phoenix.
 

20070126: Serial Killer Suspect Pleads Not Guilty AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News
A suspected Arizona serial killer pleaded not guilty to a 74-count indictment while his lawyers asked the judge to move his trial out of Phoenix.

 

Attorneys for Mark Goudeau, who prosecutors accuse of being the "Baseline Killer" who killed nine people, told Judge James Keppel the defense does not believe their client would be able to get a fair trial in the city, the Arizona Republic reported Friday.

Defense attorney Corwin Townsend said the Phoenix police chief, mayor and county attorney have all publicly declared that Goudeau is guilty, hurting his chance of a fair trial.

Goudeau is due back in court Feb. 2.

 

20070125: Lawyers for accused serial killer want trial moved out of Phoenix AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News
Accused serial killer Mark Goudeau on Thursday pleaded not guilty to multiple murder, rape and kidnapping charges that police say occurred during a 13-month period.
Goudeau, 42, is charged with 94 crimes in all, including nine murders. Prosecutors have not said whether they would seek the death penalty if Goudeau is convicted.
During his arraignment Thursday in Maricopa County Superior Court, defense lawyer Corwin Townsend asked Judge James Keppel to move the trial out of the Phoenix area.
Goudeau's wife, Wendy Carr, said she believes police arrested the wrong man and was frustrated that her husband is already considered guilty by many. Monday night, somebody riddled her home with bullets.
"Why don't they just throw a rope over a tree and hang my husband out in public?" Carr told reporters earlier this week.
Another hearing was scheduled for Feb. 2.
Goudeau, a former construction worker, previously was convicted of armed robbery, kidnapping and aggravated assault. He was released early from prison in 2004.
About a year later, police said, Goudeau allegedly started to prey on people at random. They said he is Phoenix's so-called "Baseline Killer."
Police arrested Goudeau in September for two alleged sexual assaults in 2005. In December, prosecutors said they believed he was involved in the other crimes attributed to the Baseline Killer, and prosecutors announced his indictment on the murder charges on Jan 16. Police said they had forensic evidence, including DNA and ballistics, tying Goudeau to the killings.
 

20070118: 'Baseline Killer' is charged with nine murders AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News

The top prosecutor in the Phoenix area told residents Tuesday that the rash of serial attacks that put the region on edge for months was finally over.

Maricopa County Attorney Andrew Thomas announced a 74-count indictment against Mark Goudeau, a former construction worker suspected of being the area's serial "Baseline Killer."

The charges, which include nine counts of first-degree murder, 15 counts of sexual assault and 11 counts of kidnapping, stem from crimes committed between August 2005 and June 2006 throughout the Phoenix area.

"The reign of terror has ended," Thomas said. "The quest for justice has just begun."

Defense lawyer Corwin Townsend said Goudeau will plead not guilty to the new charges. He has already pleaded not guilty to two sexual assaults that authorities also attributed to the Baseline Killer.

"We haven't changed our position at all," he said. "The fact that they threw out more charges does not change our belief that they have the wrong guy."

Townsend said he will add to Goudeau's defense team to handle the new charges, some of which could potentially lead to the death penalty under a conviction.

Police announced last month that the man they believed to be the Baseline Killer was in custody and recommended that Goudeau be charged with murder and other crimes.

Goudeau, an ex-convict, has been in jail since September, when he was arrested in the two sexual assaults. At the time, police stopped short of pronouncing Goudeau the Baseline Killer while they built a case against him.

But last month, police said that investigators had collected forensic evidence - including DNA and ballistics - and other evidence implicating Goudeau in the killings.

"We feel very confident about these charges, very good about where we are with the evidence," Thomas said Tuesday.

Goudeau's defense team has hired its own forensics expert to analyze evidence that led to the sexual assault charges. According to their expert, Townsend said it doesn't appear that Goudeau can be definitively linked to the suspected sexual assaults of two women in September 2005.

Goudeau is still scheduled to face the sexuaßl assault charges in a trial to start Monday. But Townsend said the trial likely will be postponed until March.

The Baseline Killer case originally included eight killings. A ninth was publicly revealed in December. Most of the victims, all but one of them women, were killed going about their daily activities, such as leaving work, washing a car or waiting at a bus stop.

Police have said the killer usually struck at night and wore disguises, including a wig of dreadlocks and a fisherman's hat. The name Baseline Killer came from the Phoenix street where some of the earliest crimes were committed.

About half of the Baseline Killer attacks occurred within three miles of the Phoenix home Goudeau shared with his wife. One woman was killed just around the corner.

Goudeau had previously served 13' years in prison for three aggravated assaults, armed robbery and kidnapping before being paroled in 2004.

He once blamed his history of violence on a weakness for crack cocaine.

The Baseline Killer was one of two serial killer cases that spread fear across the Phoenix area in recent months.

In August, police arrested two roommates in what was dubbed the Serial Shooter case. The two men are accused of driving around the city and its suburbs at night, firing at people randomly from a car. Seven people were killed.

The defendants are awaiting trial.

 

 

20070117: Trial date postponed for Baseline Killer suspect AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News

The trial of a man accused in a rash of serial attacks has been postponed, and no new trial date has been set, prosecutors said Wednesday.

Mark Goudeau, indicted last week on 74 felony charges including nine counts of first-degree murder and 15 counts of sexual assault, was set for trial Monday in two other sexual assaults that he was charged with earlier.

Goudeau, 42, is suspected of being metropolitan Phoenix’s “Baseline Killer,” one of two serial killer cases that spread fear across the area in recent months.

When he was arrested four months ago in two 2005 sexual assaults, police stopped short of pronouncing Goudeau the Baseline Killer while they built a case against him. They have recently said he was indeed the serial killer responsible for numerous other attacks including the 2005 sexual assaults.

According to police reports in the 2005 sexual assaults, two sisters, ages 21 and 23, were sexually assaulted while walking in a park at night. Goudeau’s lawyer has said it doesn’t appear that Goudeau can be definitively linked to both sexual assaults and that he will plead not guilty to the new charges.

 

20070112: Baseline Killer suspect gets new neighbor in jail AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News
Baseline Killer suspect Mark Goudeau was moved to a new jail cell Friday, following a Tribune report that he had been housed in an adjacent cell to Serial Shooter suspect Dale Hausner. “They’ve already been moved,” jail spokeswoman Lisa Allen McPherson said Friday afternoon. She said Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio made the decision because he did not like the misleading implication in the Tribune article that the suspects had a “growing friendship.” A news release from the sheriff’s office acknowledges that Goudeau and Hausner had been housed in adjacent cells until Friday in the Special Management Unit at Maricopa County’s Fourth Avenue Jail. Arpaio said the unit is where the most dangerous suspects are housed, and each inmate is separated by several feet of concrete and steel and no one is within view or earshot of one another. “Hausner would appear to have quite an imagination,” Arpaio said in the statement. “My detention staff says there has not been any direct contact between these men and that Hausner misled the reporter in order to get more publicity for himself.” Hausner and Samuel Dieteman were arrested Aug. 4 at their Mesa apartment and charged with 37 random shootings linked to the “Serial Shooters.” The case spanned 14 months and included seven slayings in Mesa, Scottsdale and Phoenix. Hausner said in a telephone interview Wednesday that he had been moved to the cell next to Goudeau after he attempted suicide in December. “I see him every day and we talk,” Hausner said. “He seems to be a very nice person.” Goudeau, apparently, did not return the sentiment. Arpaio’s news release said Goudeau told jail officials Friday morning that he has never spoken to Hausner and “would not want to affiliate himself in any way ‘with a mass murderer.’” Phoenix police have named Goudeau a suspect in 19 incidents linked to the “Baseline Killer.” That case includes rapes, robberies and slayings across the Valley from August 2005 to June 2006 and overlapped the Serial Shooter investigation. The sheriff’s statement did not address one question: If Hausner and Goudeau had no contact with each other, how did Hausner know the identity of his next-door neighbor? “People talk,” Allen McPherson explained. But she emphasized that this did not include the possibility that Hausner and Goudeau had talked to each other.
 

20061209: Baseline Killer - 71 charges AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News
A MAN suspected of being America’s Baseline Killer has been charged with NINE murders.

Crack addict Mark Goudeau, 42, faces a total of 71 charges including sexual assaults.

Most of the murders were random shootings on the streets at night.

Seven of the victims were women, aged between 19 and 39.

Half of the attacks were within three miles of the home Goudeau shared with wife Wendy Carr in Phoenix, Arizona.

Police Chief Jack Harris said police followed up 8,000 leads before naming him as the serial killer. Goudeau was arrested in September.

Goudeau served 13½ years in prison for assaults, armed robbery and kidnapping before being released in 2004.

 

20061208: Man Is Held In Phoenix As 'Baseline' Serial Killer AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News
A broad-shouldered cement-plant worker who kept a tidy garden and enjoyed hiking in the desert with his wife was accused Thursday by Phoenix police of committing a series of murders, sexual assaults and other crimes now tied to the "Baseline Killer," a serial predator who set the city's nerves on edge for months.

Phoenix Police Chief Jack Harris announced at a news conference Thursday that the largest investigation in the history of his department produced 71 recommended felony charges against the suspect, Mark Goudeau. Those recommendations were handed over to the Maricopa County Attorney's Office for prosecution.

Goudeau, 42, was arrested Sept. 6 near his Phoenix home and charged with 20 counts of sexual assault, sexual abuse and kidnapping stemming from the abduction of two women in a city park in September 2005. Although the crimes had been linked by method of operation to the mysterious Baseline Killer, authorities did not charge Goudeau in any other Baseline crimes until Thursday.

Goudeau has pleaded not guilty in the park incident and faces a Jan. 22 trial in Maricopa County Superior Court.

The Baseline Killer, so named because of earlier crimes that occurred near the Baseline Road area of South Phoenix, was one of two serial murderers who independently prowled the city and its suburbs in 2005 and early 2006. The other predator, the "Serial Shooter," terrorized the city with random shootings of people who happened to be outside late at night. The killers left a mystifying trail of 15 corpses and dozens of other people who had been shot, kidnapped, robbed or sexually assaulted. Horses and dogs were also wounded or slaughtered.

Now, police say, the predators have been arrested.

In early August, Dale Hausner, 33, a janitor at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport, and his roommate, Samuel Dieteman, 30, were arrested and charged with a string of slayings and drive-by shootings linked to the Serial Shooter.

Dieteman has been charged with two killings and a series of attempted murders and drive-by shootings; Hausner has been charged with seven slayings and a string of attempted murders, aggravated assaults and drive-by shootings. The men reportedly likened the killings to sport, dubbing them "random recreational violence." Both men pleaded not guilty to all charges connected with the 14-month spree. Hausner, the father of a seriously ill child, attempted suicide last week by ingesting painkillers and allergy medication while in jail, according to the sheriff's office.

Goudeau previously served 13 years in prison for aggravated assault, kidnapping and robbery. The Baseline Killer crimes, in which the attacker wore disguises and pounced on his victims at night, began several months after Goudeau was paroled from prison. The attacks stopped, officials said, after Goudeau was arrested in September for allegedly assaulting the women in the park.

Investigators said they conducted about 3,500 interviews and followed up on 2,500 investigative leads to reach the "overwhelming" forensic, physical and circumstantial evidence that ties Goudeau to the crimes. Other charges may be forthcoming, detectives said.

At a September news conference, Goudeau's wife, Wendy, 47, a business consultant, defended her husband of 15 years, describing the "once-idyllic life" she shared with him.

"We spend all of our time together hiking, biking, walking, camping and just being together. We had an active and fulfilling life, even in the small things that we did and shared," she said.

Goudeau's attorneys, Corwin Townsend and Cary Lackey, said Goudeau will continue to maintain his innocence.

"His stance has always been they've got the wrong guy," Townsend said.

 

 

20060912: Man linked to Phoenix serial killer case AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News
An ex-con was charged in two sexual assaults linked to a serial killing investigation, but police still are not saying he is the so-called Baseline Killer believed responsible for eight deaths during the past year. Goudeau has not been named as a suspect in the numerous rapes, robberies and eight shooting deaths that have become known as the Baseline Killer case, said Maricopa County Attorney Andrew Thomas. Police are still trying to determine whether Goudeau is connected, Thomas said. At a news conference on Monday, Thomas said Arizona‘s parole board was "naive and misguided" when it granted early release to Goudeau in 2004. Goudeau had eight more years to serve on a prison sentence for unrelated assault charges. "The victims of these brutal crimes deserve justice," Thomas said. "I will do everything in my power to ensure that this defendant never again walks the streets a free man." Goudeau‘s wife also has said he is innocent. In the Serial Shooter case, police arrested Dale S. Hausner, 33, and Samuel Dieteman, 30, early last month. The roommates are charged with murder and attempted murder in 16 shootings, two of them fatal. Both pleaded not guilty.
 

20060908: Baseline Killer suspect jailed; police cautious AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News
Phoenix police aren't closing the door on the "Baseline Killer" spree despite the arrest Wednesday night of a parolee. Phoenix resident Mark Goudeau, 42, sits behind bars, but authorities won't say if they've captured the serial killer believed responsible for eight homicides and 23 crimes overall. Detectives have linked Goudeau through forensic evidence to only one case attributed to the Baseline Killer: the rape of two sisters last Sept. 20 in south Phoenix. Police and city officials treaded lightly through two morning news conferences Thursday, driving home the message that investigators still have much work to do to solve the rest of the cases. "I wouldn't make any assumptions about whether or not this individual is or is not responsible for the other crimes at this time because it's just simply a matter of letting the investigation play out," Phoenix police Cmdr. Kim Humphrey said. However, Humphrey said Goudeau "definitely resembles" the man portrayed in composite sketches of the Baseline Killer. "It is possible that there is more than one individual who has been perpetrating these crimes," Humphrey said. "It is also possible that there is one individual that has perpetrated all these crimes." The cautious mood varies greatly from the early August arrests of Serial Shooter suspects Dale S. Hausner and Samuel J. Dieteman. "We know we have the individuals involved," Phoenix Assistant Chief Kevin Robinson said after those arrests. The hunt for the Baseline Killer sent scores of officers into the streets. Police racked up thousands of hours patrolling and following up on hundreds of tips, Phoenix police spokesman Sgt. Andy Hill said. On Thursday morning, Goudeau said nothing while making his initial court appearance in Phoenix. He was booked on four counts of sexual assault and two counts each of aggravated assault, sexual abuse and kidnapping. Maricopa County Superior Court Commissioner Sheila Madden ruled he would be held without bond. "My husband is innocent," Goudeau's wife, Wendy Carr, told The Associated Press in a telephone interview. "This is a huge miscarriage of justice. And they have an innocent man in prison. This is all a mistake. He shouldn't be in prison for something he didn't do." According to the Department of Corrections, Goudeau has convictions for three aggravated assaults in 1989 and armed robbery and kidnapping in 1990. In the first case, he was charged with hitting a woman over the head with a shotgun, trying to force her to snort cocaine, sexually assaulting her, beating her head against a barbell and trying to drown her, according to court records. He served 13 years on those convictions before being paroled in 2004, eight years before his sentence was to end. During his parole hearing, Goudeau told the five-member Arizona Board of Executive Clemency that he was a reformed man, according to board documents. He blamed his problems on a weakness for cocaine — an addiction he beat while in prison. Clemency board Chairman Duane Belcher Sr. said it's too soon to say whether the decision was a mistake. The Baseline Killer hasn't struck since June 29, when Carmen Miranda, 37, was kidnapped at a car wash and later killed. Residents in Goudeau's east Phoenix neighborhood said police had been watching the area since Sunday. Randy Reyman, who has lived in the area for 30 years, said he saw up to 20 unmarked police vehicles head to Goudeau's address. They stopped Goudeau at gunpoint while he was in his truck, said Goudeau's nephew, Travis Carro.
 

20060907: Serial Killer Probe Leads To Arrest In Sexual Assault Cases AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News
Police investigating eight deadly attacks blamed on the "Baseline Killer" have arrested a man in two 2005 sexual assaults connected to the case, authorities said Thursday. Police have forensic evidence to connect Mark Goudeau, 42, to two sexual assaults that occurred on Sept. 20, Phoenix Police Chief Jack Harris said. "We will continue to pour over evidence we have obtained and further analysis that's forthcoming regarding other cases. However, at this time, we again have no evidence to connect the other crimes in this series to this individual," Harris said at a news conference. He stressed that the evidence that led to Goudeau's arrest was not the same evidence that linked 11 of the 23 crimes connected to the Baseline Killer. However, he said police were following up on other possibly related crimes. Goudeau was booked into jail while witnesses from the 2005 attack were called to look at a photo line-up, police spokesman Andy Hill said. "We still consider all those other cases open at this point," Hill said. "The investigation is continuing and we have a lot of work ahead of us." The man's wife, Wendy Carr, told The Associated Press that police had arrested the wrong man. "My husband is innocent," Carr said in a telephone interview. "This is a huge miscarriage of justice. And they have an innocent man in prison. This is all a mistake. He shouldn't be in prison for something he didn't do." Hill said police first got the man's name in mid-July but didn't identify him as a possible suspect in the sexual assault case until last weekend. They kept him under surveillance until his arrest Wednesday. Officers had spoken to the man previously, Hill said, but noted police talked to many people during the course of the investigation. Hill said the man has a criminal record, but he wouldn't elaborate. "His arrest is a good thing," Mayor Phil Gordon said. "Any individual who has been arrested for rape and kidnapping is a violent monster off the street. That's a good day." Goudeau's neighbors said that they couldn't believe he would attack anybody and that he didn't resemble the police sketch that has been widely circulated depicting the Baseline Killer as a man with dreadlocks. They described him as friendly, a cement worker who left early in the morning for jobs around the county and was a regular presence in his front yard where he'd keep meticulous care of his bushes and waved to neighbors. Barbara Holzapfel described him as a "wonderful guy." She remembered him talking to her about the Baseline Killer investigation after 37-year-old Carmen Miranda was killed June 29 at a car wash a block away. "He would say, 'There are idiots all over the world,"' Holzapfel said. The "Baseline Killer" has been linked to 23 crimes in the Phoenix metropolitan area dating to August 2005, including eight killings. The crimes also include 11 sexual assaults of women and young girls and several robberies. The earliest crimes occurred along Phoenix's Baseline Road, where the name "Baseline Killer" originated. Reports show the sexual assaults ranged from fondling to rape. In many cases, victims had conversations with the man before they were attacked. He appeared to always have a gun, and often threatened to shoot and kill victims. The Baseline Killer is also thought to wear disguises. He strikes quickly, in the dark, and generally targets people who are alone. According to reports previously released by the Phoenix Police Department, the man in some cases asked for a ride and even said "thank you" after taking money. A task force of more than 100 officers and detectives has been tracking him for months. The case is one of two serial predator cases that have shaken the Phoenix area over the past year. In the other, dubbed the "Serial Shooter" investigation, police arrested Dale S. Hausner, 33, and Samuel Dieteman, 30, early last month. The roommates are charged with murder and attempted murder in 16 shootings, two of them fatal. Both pleaded not guilty. Police believe Hausner and Dieteman took turns shooting random victims throughout the Phoenix area late at night and early in the morning. Police are investigating a total of 37 random shootings believed to be connected that killed seven people and wounded 17 since May 2005.
 

20060907: Phoenix police get possible break in serial sex killer case AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News
Police swooped in on a suspect, tying him to one of a string of assaults linked to Phoenix's "Baseline Killer." However, Police Chief Jack Harris warned Thursday that the case against 41-year-old Mark Goudeau has not been linked to 22 other crimes blamed on the sexual predator and killer who has terrorized Arizona's largest city for more than a year. "At this time we have no evidence to connect the other crimes in this series to this individual," Harris said. He said a tip in July from the public initially led police to Goudeau. He was identified as a suspect Saturday, he said. Photos of the Goudeau will be shown to victims as police work to see if they can build a case in one of two serial killer investigations in Phoenix. So far, there is "definitive forensic evidence" linking the suspect to a sexual assault that was one of 23 crimes blamed on the "Baseline Killer," Phoenix Police Department spokesman Sgt. Andy Hill said Thursday. (Watch police reveal how they tracked the suspect -- 2:17) The other 22 cases -- including eight slayings -- are still considered open, Hill said. Eleven of those are connected by separate forensic evidence. The "Baseline Killer" preyed on girls and women and often chatted to victims before assaulting them, The Associated Press reported. The attacker, who police say changed hairstyles and hats as well as wearing disguises, first struck in August 2005. He has been blamed for eight killings, seven sexual assaults and eight robberies committed during the same period as a so-called "Serial Shooter" was terrorizing Phoenix with dozens of apparently random shootings. At least six people were killed in those shootings. Dale S. Hausner, 33, and Samuel John Dieteman, 30, were arrested last month in the "Serial Shooter" case. They have pleaded not guilty to charges of murder and attempted murder. Police: Attacker reportedly said 'thanks' A tip from a member of the public helped officers find the suspect in the "Baseline Killer" case, the police spokesman said. "We did develop probable cause to make an arrest," Hill said, adding that officers had devoted "thousands of man hours on the case." A special police unit arrested the man during a traffic stop made at 5 p.m. Wednesday, Hill said. The man, who Hill said had a criminal record, is being charged with sexual assault and kidnapping. The "Baseline Killer" targeted women working from a fried taquito truck, near a construction site, and in 37-year-old Carmen Miranda's case, at a car wash on June 29, his last known killing, the AP reported. Nearly a dozen assaults of women and girls -- ranging from fondling to rape -- have been blamed on the "Baseline Killer," with the attacker striking up conversations with many of the victims beforehand, the AP said. The man appeared to be armed always, generally targeted people who were alone, operated quickly in the dark and often threatened to shoot and kill his victims, the AP reported. The "Baseline Killer" has sometimes asked for a ride and even said "thank you" after taking money, according to reports by the Phoenix Police Department cited by the AP. The name was attached to the attacker after the series of crimes began along Baseline Road in Phoenix.
 

20060907: Phoenix police arrest man in serial killer case AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News
Investigators hunting a serial killer suspected of eight murders and a string of sexual assaults in Phoenix have arrested a man for two sexual assaults linked to the case, police said on Thursday. Phoenix police said officers arrested 41-year-old Mark Goudeau on Wednesday at a traffic stop on suspicion of sexual assault and kidnapping linked to the so-called "Baseline Killer" investigation. The case covers a spree of 23 crimes, including eight homicides and a string of rapes, sexual assaults and robberies clustered around the Baseline Road area of south Phoenix since August last year. Phoenix Police Chief Jack Harris said Goudeau had been arrested on suspicion of sexual assault involving two victims in September 2005. But he cautioned that forensic evidence did not match Goudeau with at least 11 of the 23 incidents in the investigation. "This suspect has been arrested for the sexual assault of two victims in one case only, and is not connected to any of the other offenses in this series at this time," Harris told a news conference. The case is one of two involving serial killers that have unnerved residents of the Phoenix area over the past year. Last month, police arrested two men in the so-called "Serial Shooter" investigation. Dale Hausner and Samuel Dieteman were charged with murder and attempted murder in 16 shootings, two of them fatal. The two men, who pleaded not guilty to the charges, are accused of gunning down pedestrians at random in the sprawling Phoenix metropolitan area of 3.7 million people over a 15-month period. Harris called on media not to publish photographs of Goudeau as police were planning an identity line-up later in the day. The Baseline Killer last struck on June 29, shooting dead a woman in Phoenix.
 

20060821: Baseline Killer on the loose in Phoenix AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News
Police comb cold case files for clues to killer of 8 When Romelia Vargas was gunned down in the catering truck where she fried taquitos, police had few answers for her husband. Maybe the mother of twin baby boys got into trouble selling drugs -- that was the best they could offer. Alvin Hogue never accepted that explanation, but when a detective called months later with a better one, he was so stunned he had to pull his cement truck over to the side of the road. Vargas and her cook, Mirna Palma-Roman, were victims of the Baseline Killer, a serial predator who police say has killed eight people and sexually assaulted 11 other women and girls in the Phoenix area in just over a year. His targets have been random and vulnerable, like the two women working alone one February morning near a construction site. "I was in disbelief," Hogue said in an interview at his home this month while his 9-month-old twin sons wiggled and whined at his feet. "I'll be so happy when they catch him." After arresting two suspects in another serial killing case this month, authorities have ramped up their efforts to find the Baseline Killer, named for the south Phoenix road near where the earliest crimes occurred. The investigation is revisiting hundreds of unsolved cases in hopes of tracking the man down. Police will not discuss their lab work, but say they have tried to connect cold cases to those already linked to the Baseline Killer using state and federal forensic databases. "We have a whole room dedicated to the task force, replete with computers and investigators and analysts," said Sgt. Andy Hill, a spokesman for Phoenix police. "There's a lot of leads from the past we've had. There's a lot of leads that are coming in" through anonymous tips. Although the search has not netted the Baseline Killer, it has provided some answers for victims' families and shed light on other investigations. In one case, Phoenix investigators linked the Baseline Killer to a killing in nearby Tempe that had been blamed on another man. Police say they are still getting a high volume of calls from tipsters, despite the focus on the August 3 arrests of suspects in Phoenix's other serial-killings case -- the Serial Shooter case. Samuel John Dieteman and Dale S. Hausner pleaded not guilty Monday to two counts of murder and 14 counts of attempted murder in that case. (Full story) The Baseline Killer's most recent attack was nearly two months ago, when police say he carjacked 37-year-old Carmen Miranda at a car wash and later killed her. "There's a possibility that the suspect could have moved to a different area," Hill said. TV stations continue to broadcast a police sketch of what the Baseline Killer might look like, though investigators say they still do not really know. He is thought to wear disguises, changing hats and the length of his hair. He strikes quickly, in the dark, and generally targets people who are alone. Police say they have no suspects. "It's got to be a person who's in a lot of pain," Hogue said. "For him to do something so heinous, to go around killing people so indiscriminately, the best thing for him to do is turn himself in and get some help." Hogue said he's trying to move on. He's hired a nanny for his sons, and the lunch wagon is back on the street. But when Vargas was alive, the business had been doing so well the couple had planned to convert another truck and start a franchise. "You know the person who took her life? They took potentially 50 years from my wife," Hogue said. "The joys from her life. Her kids, her family, to watch her kids grow up, kids, grandkids."
 

20060817: Phoenix police seeing increased calls in hunt for serial killer AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News
Police investigating a serial killer said Thursday that they were seeing an increase in calls from potential tipsters as details of the disguises used by the criminal have been made public. Investigators said they hope the descriptions will generate more tips in the case against the so-called "Baseline Killer," who is suspected of killing eight people and committing 11 sexual assaults and several robberies over the last year. While authorities have circulated a sketch of a suspect with a wig of dreadlocks and a fisherman's hat, police say the killer has altered his appearance to avoid arrest. "He is changing the way that he looks, the way that he smells, the way that he talks," said Phoenix police spokesman Andy Hill. Police reports released this week in 10 of the cases provide details of some of the appearance changes. The suspect wore a costume mask in May when he kidnapped and fondled a woman, who noted that the man smelled of old beer. The victim said her attacker looked like a transient and was pushing a shopping cart. A year ago, victims of an armed robbery and sexual assault outside a nightclub said the suspect wore a baseball cap and had no particular odor about him. He told one of the victims not to look at him. At a bus stop holdup in December, the victim didn't get a good look at the suspect's face because it was covered by a hooded sweat shirt and a wool ski cap. "We don't know what this person looks like in real life," Hill said. "The (fisherman's) hat, the ball cap, the length of sleeves on his clothing, the bulky clothing - there are so many things that can change." Tips from the public played a large part in another serial killer case in metropolitan Phoenix, Hill said. Earlier this month, police arrested two men in that case. Dale S. Hausner, 33, and Samuel John Dieteman, 30, each face two counts of first-degree murder, 14 counts of attempted first-degree murder, 14 counts of aggravated assault and 16 counts of drive-by shooting.
 

20060817: Reports Show How Phoenix Killer Operates AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News
A serial killer who is haunting the Phoenix area often speaks with his victims before attacking, sometimes asking for a ride or money, according to police reports. But victims of the so-called Baseline Killer — who has been linked to deaths, sexual assaults and robberies beginning last summer — gave varying accounts of his appearance and demeanor. Some victims said he appeared smart, other victims said the opposite was true. One woman said the man smelled of old beer. One said he appeared handsome at first. And another told police he was wearing a mask, pushing a shopping cart and appeared to be a "crazy transient" asking for money. The reports, released by police Wednesday, offered the first glimpse into how the killer operates. The "Baseline Killer" has been forensically linked to eight killings and several robberies. Police also believe he is responsible for 11 sexual assaults of women and young girls. The reports show the sexual assaults have ranged from fondling to rape. In many cases, victims had conversations with the man before they were attacked. He appears to always have a gun, and often threatens to shoot and kill victims. The varying descriptions of the attacker and his mannerism show that he is "apparently clever with disguises," said Sgt. Andy Hill said. "He doesn't want people to know what he is really like," Hill said. A 21-year-old victim who was sexually assaulted last November told police she first saw the man as she was tossing a bag of clothes into a donation bin in central Phoenix. "I thought he was just asking for a ride," the woman told police. "He started saying that he needed me to take him down the corner, and I was just like in shock." He said he had just a robbed a place. The man was wearing a fisherman's hat, a wig and big round plastic glasses without lenses. "He was telling me just to drive (the) speed limit so not to cause attention," the woman said. He told her to calm down, that he'd kill her if she tried anything stupid. Then he told her to stop and turn off her car. "Put your seat down," he told her. "You don't make the seat go down, I'll shoot you." He told her to take off her clothes. He said it was so he'd have more time to get away. But then he started touching her. She asked him to stop. He didn't. When it was over, he took money from her wallet and left. The last time the Baseline Killer struck was June 29, when he killed 37-year-old Carmen Miranda after abducting her from a car wash. Since February, only one victim has survived an attack by the suspect, and police credit her with "heroic actions." She had just walked out of a check-cashing business when she saw a man in a mask pushing a shopping cart. She was opening her car door when he ran up to her, pointed a gun and told her to give him a ride, police reports say. Once in the car, he told the woman to drive. Soon after, he had her pull over in a secluded area and ordered her to make the seat lie flat. He told her to take off her clothes, saying, "I am going away for a long time, and you are the last woman I am going to be able to touch." The woman refused to perform oral sex, even after the man threatened to kill her. "Would you rather die?" he asked. "Yes, kill me," she said. "You're not going to violate me." She took the keys and ran away. Police say they have had hundreds of leads to follow, and the reports indicate that several suspects were questioned about various attacks. The Baseline Killer is one of two serial predator cases in the Phoenix area. In another, dubbed the "Serial Shooter" investigation, police arrested Dale S. Hausner, 33, and Samuel John Dieteman, 30. Police believe the men took turns shooting random victims late at night and early in the morning. Seven killings and 17 nonfatal shootings have been linked to the Serial Shooter case. Hausner and Dieteman are scheduled to be arraigned on 46 felony counts Monday.
 

20060817: Police Reports: Phoenix Serial Killer Often Talks to Victims Before Attacking AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News
A serial killer who is haunting the Phoenix area often speaks with his victims before attacking, sometimes asking for a ride or money, according to police reports. But victims of the so-called Baseline Killer — who has been linked to deaths, sexual assaults and robberies beginning last summer — gave varying accounts of his appearance and demeanor. Some victims said he appeared smart, other victims said the opposite was true. One woman said the man smelled of old beer. One said he appeared handsome at first. And another told police he was wearing a mask, pushing a shopping cart and appeared to be a "crazy transient" asking for money. The reports, released by police Wednesday, offered the first glimpse into how the killer operates. The "Baseline Killer" has been forensically linked to eight killings and several robberies. Police also believe he is responsible for 11 sexual assaults of women and young girls. The reports show the sexual assaults have ranged from fondling to rape. In many cases, victims had conversations with the man before they were attacked. He appears to always have a gun, and often threatens to shoot and kill victims.
 

20060817: New reports show how Phoenix serial killer operates AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News
A serial killer who has been striking in the Phoenix area for more than a year approached his victims before attacking, sometimes asking for a ride and even saying ‘‘thank you'' after receiving money, according to newly released reports by the Phoenix Police Department. The ‘‘Baseline Killer'' has been forensically linked to eight killings and several robberies. Police also believe he is responsible for 11 sexual assaults of women and young girls. Police reports released Wednesday reveal the first glimpse into how the killer operates. The reports show the sexual assaults have ranged from fondling to oral sex and rape. In many cases, victims had conversations with the man before they were attacked. He appears to always have a gun, and often threatens to shoot and kill victims. One victim told police the Baseline Killer was wearing a mask, pushing a shopping cart and appeared to be a ‘‘crazy transient'' asking for money. While some said he appeared smart, other victims said the opposite was true. One woman said the man smelled of old beer. Another said he appeared handsome, at first. The varying descriptions of the attacker and his mannerism show that he is ‘‘apparently clever with disguises,'' said Sgt. Andy Hill said. ‘‘He doesn't want people to know what he is really like,'' Hill said. One report released Wednesday gave details on how the predator operates. A 21-year-old victim who was sexually assaulted but not killed on Nov. 3 told Phoenix police she first saw the man as she was tossing a bag of clothes into a donation bin in central Phoenix. ‘‘He got to me and he I thought he was just asking for a ride,'' the woman told police. ‘‘He started saying that he needed me to take him down the corner, and I was just like in shock.'' He said he had just a robbed a place. The man was wearing a fisherman's hat, a wig and big round plastic glasses without lenses. ‘‘He was telling me just to drive (the) speed limit so not to cause attention,'' the woman said. He told her to calm down, that he'd kill her if she tried anything stupid. Then he told her to stop and turn off her car. ‘‘Put your seat down,'' he told her. ‘‘You don't make the seat go down, I'll shoot you.'' He told her to take off her clothes. He said it was so he'd have more time to get away. But then he started touching her. She asked him to stop. He didn't. When it was over, he took money from her wallet and left. In another incident, he told a male victim to get on the ground and to give him cash. The man, who had just opened the car door for his girlfriend and was walking to the driver's side, handed over $15, then a $100 bill. The killer then opened the passenger door and demanded money from the girlfriend. When she threw out her purse, he demanded she remove the cash herself and hand it to him. ‘‘Don't look at me,'' he told her. He fondled her breast before telling the boyfriend to get in the car and drive away. The last time the Baseline Killer struck was June 29, when he killed 37-year-old Carmen Miranda after abducting her from a carwash in central Phoenix. Since February, only one victim has survived an attack by the suspect, and police credit her ‘‘heroic actions.'' She had just walked out of a check-cashing business when she saw a man in a mask pushing a shopping cart. She was opening her car door when he ran up to her, pointed a gun and told her to give him a ride, police reports say. Once in the car, he told the woman to drive. Soon after, he had her pull over in a secluded area and ordered her to make the seat lie flat. He told her to take her clothes off, saying, ‘‘I am going away for a long time, and you are the last woman I am going to be able to touch.'' The woman refused to perform oral sex, even after the man threatened to kill her. ‘‘Would you rather die?'' he asked. ‘‘Yes, kill me,'' she said. ‘‘You're not going to violate me.'' Before taking her keys and running away, she told the man he would have to shoot her in the back. Police say they have had hundreds of leads to follow, and the reports indicate several suspects were questioned in connection with various attacks. One man was booked involving sexual assault and robbery after several victims identified him as their attacker. Court records say charges against that man were dismissed in May. The Baseline Killer is one of two serial predator cases in the Phoenix area. In another, dubbed the ‘‘Serial Shooter'' investigation, police arrested Dale S. Hausner, 33, and Samuel John Dieteman, 30. Police believe the men took turns shooting random victims throughout the Phoenix area late at night and early in the morning. Seven killings and 17 nonfatal shootings have been linked to the Serial Shooter case.
 

20060807: "Baseline Killer" a priority AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News
A year has passed. He is still out there, somewhere. The predator known as the "Baseline Killer" started his rampage on Aug. 6, 2005, with the sexual assault of two teenage girls. He was almost forgotten at a media conference Friday when police announced the arrest of two men in the Valley's "Serial Shooter" case. But the Baseline Killer, believed to be responsible for eight murders, 11 sexual assaults and eight robberies, remains a priority, police say. Experts on serial killers say residents should not relax. With all the attention on the Serial Shooter case, they fear the Baseline Killer could strike again in an effort to regain the spotlight. Police aren't taking a break. "All the excitement about catching the Serial Shooters is tempered until we get the Baseline Killer," Phoenix police Sgt. Andy Hill said. "There were lots of smiles and handshakes when the Serial Shooters were arrested, but the Baseline Killer case did not stop for a moment. "Our priority is to prevent any more attacks," he said. To do that, police are taking at least some of the officers on the Serial Shooter task force and moving them to the Baseline Killer case. Others will stay behind to continue working on the Serial Shooter cases. Paige Rockett, who lives north of Indian School Road along 25th and 26th streets near where the Baseline Killer has struck, said her neighbors are still on edge. "Finding the serial shooters hasn't really brought us any particular relief," said Rockett, a member of Hoffman Terrace Neighborhood Association. "I think we share the frustration that the whole community shares: No one knows what the guy looks like. It's like, 'What should we be looking for?' " Lacking specifics Even police cannot say exactly what they are looking for in the Baseline case. They had even less of a clue in the Serial Shooter case until a series of tips panned out early last week. Samuel John Dieteman, 30, and Dale Hausner, 33, were taken into custody late Thursday. Of the two sets of serial killers, the Baseline Killer always appeared to be foremost in the minds of police. In daily media briefings, the Serial Shooter barely was mentioned. Police said they had little information on that case. By contrast, the Baseline case produced a composite sketch, dozens of victim interviews, a relatively restricted geographic area, even a security tape. But while the Serial Shooters continued their rampage up to a week ago, the Baseline Killer has not struck since the end of June, when Carmen Miranda, a mother of two, was snatched from a carwash on Thomas Road and murdered. It was the latest of 22 incidentsattributed to the Baseline Killer. More than 30 people have survived attacks, coming face to face with the man. But the description and composite sketch released in September has remained unchanged and lacks specifics. Police say the victims often did not get a good look because he approached from behind or in the dark or that they were so frightened they did not get details. He is described as a dark-skinned male, 25 to 30 years old, 5-foot-10, 170 pounds with a thin to medium build. He varies his hairstyle, wears a long-sleeve shirt and different hats. His first two crimes were sexual assaults, his third a robbery. Then, on Sept. 8, he killed a 19-year-old woman in Tempe. Since then, the killer has struck again and again. Police have not been forthcoming with details, but several things are clear. They know what kind of weapon he uses, they know where he committed his crimes, and they know the victims. The Police Department's reluctance to provide information is by design, said Bob Keppel, who investigated the Ted Bundy and Green River killings in the Seattle area. "Serial killers like to make sure the crimes are highlighted with media attention so they can gauge how much the cops know and how close they are," he said. "Only one person knows all the facts, and when police release information they can assess how close the police are. "If they sense police are too close, they will quit or move. But they are thinking about it all the time." Taking a break? Even though it has been more than a month since the Baseline Killer has struck, there is no reason to believe he has left town or quit killing. It is not uncommon for serial killers to take breaks between their crimes. David Berkowitz, convicted in the Son of Sam killings in New York, shot his first victims on July 29, 1976, killing one person. Subsequent shootings took place on Oct. 23; Nov. 26; Jan. 30, 1977; March 8; April 16; June 26; and July 30. He was arrested on Aug. 10, 1977. The Baseline Killer has gone as long as 58 days between crimes. The apparent randomness of the crimes is another hallmark of serial killers. Alex Femenia, lead detective in the cases, recently said the random nature of the crimes in both cases "gives us little to go on." There is no discernable relationship between the crimes, he said, and when there is no pattern, "it gives us nowhere to go." Finally, serial killers tend to like the attention. Ann Rule, a true-crime writer who has covered several serial killings, warned that the attention focused on the Serial Shooters may trigger rage in the Baseline Killer. "It is possible, though, that the other killer may strike again because, for the moment or the next few days, he has been eclipsed in the headlines." "He won't like that. He needs attention," she said. "He may write to the police, as did the BTK serial killer (Dennis Rader, who pleaded guilty last year to killing 10 people in and around Wichita, Kan.). He may strike again so he will be back in the spotlight. So people should be especially careful, and not let down their guards." Boost in confidence The arrests in the Serial Shooter case should boost morale among investigators, experts say. It validates their investigative methods, the set-up of the task force and the management of information. "The Serial Shooter cops can feel proud, and the Baseline Killer cops can feel that accomplishment too," Keppel said. Hill said the shot of confidence is welcome, although police were confident they were doing all they could do. James Alan Fox, a professor of criminal justice at Northeastern University in Boston and an expert in the field, said the police would gain experience and a new boost of energy. "It will elevate their spirits," he said. "It will make it easier to dedicate themselves to the Baseline case." But residents of the neighborhoods where the Baseline Killer has struck remain wary. Debbie Romero lives within a mile of where the Baseline Killer killed his latest victim. "I'm still not going to the carwash," she said, referring to the location where Miranda was killed June 29. "I take it to full service." And Susan Campbell of Mesa said that while she is relieved that the Serial Shooting suspects have been arrested, she remains on alert when she heads to work. "Certainly the scare isn't over," she said. 'Baseline Killer' Description: Dark-skinned male, 25 to 30 years old, 5 feet 10 inches, 170 lbs., usually wearing a long-sleeve shirt and khaki pants. He also wears various hats and may now have short hair. How to report a tip: Call (480) WITNESS or 1-800-343-TIPS. A $100,000 reward is being offered for information that will help police solve the series of violent crimes.
 

20060803: Ariz. Death Linked to Serial Killer Case AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News
The death of a woman who was gunned down while walking has been linked to a serial killer believed responsible for dozens of random shootings across metropolitan Phoenix, police said Thursday. The shooting was linked to earlier cases because of similarities and forensic evidence, said Mesa police Sgt. Chuck Trapani. Authorities say the so-called "Serial Shooter" is responsible for three dozen shootings of people, and dogs and horses. The shootings have generally happened late at night, with no witnesses. Six people were killed and 17 _ mostly pedestrians and bicyclists _ have been wounded since May 2005. Robin Blasnek, 22, was walking to her boyfriend's home in Mesa, a suburb east of Phoenix, at about 11:15 p.m. Sunday when she was gunned down. Neighbors heard a shot and ran to help the young woman, but she soon lost consciousness and died at a hospital. Her father told the East Valley Tribune that Blasnek grew up as a special needs child and lived part time with her parents in Mesa and a group home in Tempe. "She was just a great kid. Very, very naive, and pure as far as not understanding the dangers of the world," Steve Blasnek said. "I guess my only regret is that I didn't give her a big hug." Trapani said Mesa police plan to beef up patrols and have assigned a detective to the Phoenix police serial criminal task force. That unit already has about 200 officers working to try to solve the serial shooter case, plus another case involving a serial criminal dubbed the Baseline Killer. The Baseline Killer is believed responsible for killing seven women and one man and sexually assaulting 11 women and girls during the past year. Police think his most recent killing was the shooting death of 37-year-old woman at a Phoenix car wash June 29. A $100,000 reward is being offered for any information leading to the capture of either killer.
 

20060802: Baseline Killer has Tempe edgy AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News
It takes about 30 minutes to drive the stretch of Baseline Road where a serial killer has cut a path of mayhem over the past year. And while police and the media have dubbed him the "Baseline Killer," after the busy thoroughfare running near many of the attacks, the crimes are happening off the beaten path - in a large park in a middle-class to upscale neighborhood, at churches, at a popular restaurant. The randomness and unpredictability of the locations and the variety of people attacked in his 10 brazen assaults near Baseline Road adds to the anxiety, frightening residents in Tempe and other communities home the attacks. Near the incidents in Tempe, residents and those who work in the area say they are on guard 24/7, watching for clues, hoping for a break and wondering how crimes first thought to be isolated could be linked to a serial killer. Information about the Baseline Killer is posted at the Twin Butte Baptist Church on 48th Street just north of Baseline, on the Tempe-Phoenix border. Two girls 13 and 14 were sexually assaulted at gunpoint Aug. 6 at 9:45 p.m. behind the church, in a three-square-mile area with middle-class homes and a crime rate below the city's average. The church's pastor, Leon Willhite, announced the incident from the pulpit, and the church is helping to spread the word to be careful even in the daylight. "I had just came over to the church that night," Willhite said. "I went out the side door and saw two police cars. I went to the back of the building and they said, 'You can't go back there.' "It didn't really scare me, I don't let things bother me. We have to trust the Lord and know he's going to work things out." Police also have linked other Tempe crimes to the serial criminal: • The shooting death of 19-year-old Georgia Thompson in her Tempe apartment complex parking lot near Mill Avenue and U.S. 60. • The attempted robbery of a 16-year-old girl and the robbery of a man with an infant at the CVS Pharmacy at Baseline and Priest Drive. Thompson, the youngest of all the homicide victims linked to the Baseline Killer, lived at Saddle Club Apartment Homes, a large, two-story apartment complex next to a bus stop and sandwiched between another apartment complex and a strip mall with a Dairy Queen. The Idaho native had lived in Arizona for about a month and worked as a dancer at Skin Cabaret, a Scottsdale strip club. She was living with a friend and had come home from the club on Sept. 8 at about 1 a.m. when she was shot in the head in a parking lot facing Mill Avenue across the street from a bus stop. Courtney Delzompo, 23, a former resident of the apartment complex, said she remembers seeing the yellow police tape the next morning. A note on her door from complex management discussed what had happened. "I thought it was that singular incident. I thought it was that they were after her specifically," said Delzompo, who lived there for more than a year. "It wasn't scary because it seemed personal, but now that all this was happening, it seems like we should have been more afraid." She said she felt she could talk to her neighbors and everyone in the complex was friendly. "It was nice for what it was. There were a lot of places you could walk your dog," Delzompo said. "I went to bed early and there was that thing on the door and I couldn't believe it - less than a football field away, this horrible crime happened." Though it's been more than a month since the Baseline Killer has struck, authorities are urging the community to watch their surroundings and their habits. "There is still a segment of the population that is not getting the message and not responding to it," Phoenix Police Chief Jack Harris said last week. "Keep your alert level up. We're not asking that someone be so scared that they don't go out on the street. If you're a woman and you are going out late at night, take someone with you, be more alert of your surroundings."
 

20060801: "Baseline Killer" brutal, veteran cop says AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News

The serial killer who has terrorized Phoenix for almost a year attacks quickly, changes appearances often and doesn't seem to care whether he can score money from his victims, the lead investigator in the case said.
Detective Alex Feminia said Monday that he's never seen killings as brutal as those blamed on the so-called "Baseline Killer." The man who is thought to be responsible for at least eight slayings and 11 sexual assaults acts at random and targets people who are defenseless.

"To me, this person is a coward," Feminia said. "He's a coward because every victim he goes after are vulnerable people. They've done nothing to him to harm him."

Police have no suspects, Feminia said, and nobody has claimed to be the killer.
"He's very violent, and there's not much that sets him off," Feminia said.
While the killer is thought to have robbed some of his victims before killing or sexually assaulting them, Feminia said money is not his primary motivation.

The updated description says the killer is "dark-skinned." Police said he could be Hispanic or black.
Police spokesman Andy Hill said the killer is thought to be between 25 and 30, about 5 feet 10 inches tall and 170 pounds. When the killer has attacked, he has worn long-sleeved shirts and a baseball cap or beanie.
"He's probably changing his hairstyle," Feminia said. "He's either cutting his hair or wearing it up in a bun underneath a hat."

Phoenix police also have been investigating a second series of fatal shootings attributed to a killer dubbed the "Serial Shooter." The assailant - police don't know if it's a man or a woman or if the killer is working alone - is thought to have killed five people and wounded 17 others since May 2005.

 

20060801: Carwash captures serial killer on videotape AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News

While city detectives have a video tape of the abduction of a woman as she washed her car, no arrests have been made in that slaying and a series of deaths attributed to the Baseline Killer

But police have said they have a better description of the Baseline Killer, so named his first apparent attack occurred on Baseline Avenue nearly a year ago, the newspaper reported July 31.

The kidnapping and murder of Carmen Miranda occurred June 29 on a busy street in the early evening and police said they believe someone may have seen something which can provide the lead which ends with an arrest, the story said.

 

20060801: Phoenix police refine serial killer depiction AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News

The serial killer who has terrorized city neighborhoods for almost a year attacks quickly, changes appearances often, and doesn't seem to care whether he can score money from his victims, the lead investigator in the case said Monday.

Detective Alex Feminia said he's never seen killings as brutal as those blamed on the so-called "Baseline Killer." The man who is thought to be responsible for at least eight slayings and 11 sexual assaults acts at random and targets people who are defenseless.
"To me, this person is a coward," Feminia said. "He's a coward because every victim he goes after are vulnerable people. They've done nothing to him to harm him."

Police have no suspects, Feminia said, and nobody has called claiming to be the killer.
"He's very violent, and there's not much that sets him off," Feminia said.
On June 29, 37-year-old Carmen Miranda apparently did nothing to provoke the killer, Feminia said. The woman was attacked at a car wash while she vacuumed her Ford.

While the Baseline Killer is thought to have robbed some of his victims before killing or sexually assaulting them, Feminia said money is not his primary motivation.
In February, the Baseline Killer is thought to have left more than $1,000 where Romelia Vargas, 38, and Mirna Palma-Roman, 24, were slain.

The two were getting their catering truck ready for business, Feminia said, and it's possible that the Baseline Killer simply didn't have time to grab the cash before construction workers arrived.
But even if his victims didn't have cash to steal, Feminia said, "he didn't care. He'd still have killed them."
On Monday, police released a refined description of the Baseline Killer based on information from witnesses.
Investigators had said they were looking for a black male. The updated description says the Baseline Killer is "dark-skinned." Police said he could be Hispanic or black.
Police spokesman Andy Hill said the killer is thought to be between 25 and 30, about 5 feet 10 inches tall and 170 pounds

In his 28 years with Phoenix Police, Feminia said he's never seen a case quite like this:
"Because of the randomness of it, and because of the lack of connection between the victims and the suspect," he said. "That concerns us all. We have family members out there, and it could happen to anyone."

 

20060729: Lunch wagon slayings the work of Baseline Killer, police say AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News

Phoenix police on Friday attributed two more deaths to the Baseline Killer. Sgt. Andy Hill, police spokesman, said detectives have been going through previous homicide cases to look for links to a brazen criminal whose spree since August has included homicides, rapes and robberies.
 
Detectives knew late Thursday that forensic evidence from the slayings of two women Feb. 20 are definitively linked to the serial killer, Hill said.

Killed were Romelia Vargas, 38, and Mirna Palma Roman, 23. They ran a lunch wagon that makes the rounds to construction sites.

Hill said that at this point there is no evidence other offenses were committed against the women.

“It does appear to be a brazen crime,” Hill said.

He said the women were killed between 5:30 and 7 a.m. in a desolate area at 91st Avenue and Lower Buckeye Road near newly built homes and a construction site.

No witnesses have come forward, but police believe there were people in the area who might have seen or heard something, and they are urging them to contact police.

Hill said the hours are out of the time frame the killer usually strikes, but he noted that at that time of year, the sun still hasn’t risen.

The addition of Roman and Vargas to the case file brings the number of homicide victims to eight and the number of incidents to 23.

Of those cases, 11 are definitely linked by forensic evidence.

Police also are trying to catch a second killer known as the Serial Shooter, who since May 2005 has been shooting animals and people.

Police believe that person is responsible for five deaths and 35 incidents in all, including the latest on Saturday morning near Stapley Drive and Brown Road in Mesa, where a bicyclist was shot.

Learn more
What: Mesa Police Department personal safety community meeting to discuss the July 22 shooting at Brown Road and Stapley Drive that police believe is linked to the Serial Shooter.
When: 6:30 p.m. Monday
Where: Edison Elementary School gymnasium, 545 N. Horne

 

20060726: Phoenix police want migrants' help in serial killer search AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News

Police plan to reach out to the Spanish-speaking community as they continue efforts to inform the public about a pair of serial predators in metropolitan Phoenix.

Officials are organizing a community meeting to be held in Spanish next week, said Sgt. Andy Hill, a spokesman for the Phoenix Police Department.

Police hope the meeting will generate more tips on the cases and offer a chance for possible additional victims of the criminals to come forward. Hill said it's possible there are victims who haven't yet come forward because they are illegally in the United States. advertisement 
 
Many illegal immigrants avoid contact with police for fear they will be deported, and crimes they have witnessed or that have been committed against them often go unreported.

"As we move out deeper into the community, especially with reaching out to the Spanish-speaking community, we believe there may be other victims out there that haven't come forward," Hill said. "We want that information. We need that information. There will not be sanctions to victims who come forward as far as their status in this community other than the fact that they are victims."

But even immigrants who are in the country legally often fail to report crimes, sometimes because they are not fluent in English.

"There are a lot of folks here in the Valley that may have limited English skills, and they can still very much be witnesses or know something about these crimes, so we want to step forward and go out to that community and seek their assistance," said Police Chief Jack Harris.

The "Baseline Killer" has been linked to a series of sexual assaults, robberies and six killings. The "Serial Shooter" has been definitively connected to four incidents - the Dec. 29 wounding of a man and the shootings of several dogs and a horse. But, the shooter is believed responsible for five killings and 17 shootings targeting people, including the nonfatal Saturday shooting of a 30-something Mesa man who was riding his bicycle to work.

Police have not released the man's name, where on his body he was shot or what type of gun was used.

Holly Hosac, a spokeswoman for the Mesa Police Department, said the man had no information on who shot him or why. He didn't even realize he was shot until he felt a sharp pain and saw the blood, she said.

However, Hosac said the incident is the only one of its kind in Mesa, where an average of one homicide occurred every 12 days in 2005. That same year, a homicide occurred at least every 38 hours in Phoenix, where both serial predators have concentrated their crimes.

Only five incidents targeting humans related to the two serial killers occurred in cities on the outskirts of Phoenix - one killing each in Scottsdale and Tolleson, a killing and robbery in Tempe, and now a shooting in Mesa.

Hosac said officers in the department's Crime Prevention Unit are tentatively planning a personal safety presentation in light of Saturday's shooting. She said the presentation will be given in English and Spanish.

 

20060725: Baseline Killer's bloody trail AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News

He is brazen.

He once robbed a store at gunpoint, then ran across the street to carjack a woman and sexually assault her.

He strikes at night and wears disguises, snatching women from crowded corners to rape them or kill them.

And he kills without lingering, sometimes leaving the bodies just a short distance away.

Phoenix police believe the "Baseline Killer" is linked to seven sexual assaults, eight robbery incidents and six homicides. The latest was a woman abducted from a carwash and killed on June 29.

It started with a sexual assault in August, but police didn't know it yet. By late September, they started making connections.


Sept. 28
Victims: A 12-year-old girl and her 36-year-old mother.

Attacker: Unknown.

They sat in their car in a restaurant parking lot at South Central Avenue and Baseline Road, waiting for someone inside to return. It was 9:30 p.m.

Nearby, a man jumped through the restaurant's takeout window, snatching a purse and other items from an employee before he left through the same window. In the parking lot, he saw the woman and her daughter and forced his way into their car at gunpoint. He made the mother drive. In the back seat, he sexually assaulted her daughter.

Then he told the mother to park nearby. She was next.

The following day, police went public with their suspicions. The attack was similar to two others in August: Two girls, ages 13 and 14, had been sexually assaulted at gunpoint behind a church, and two women had been forced into the bushes and sexually assaulted as they walked home from a park.

In all three attacks, the description of the rapist and his behavior were remarkably similar.

As the almost-yearlong investigation progressed, police would link 21 incidents to the attacker from Aug. 6 to June 29. Known first as the "Baseline Rapist" and now as the Baseline Killer, he has shot six people to death and is connected by evidence to three robbery incidents. His tally of violence would include seven sexual assaults and five other robberies, although there is no firm forensic evidence in the latter cases. In many of those incidents, there was more than one victim.

But, back in September, police weren't 100 percent sure what they had. They released a composite sketch of the rapist, a Black man with dreadlocks and what looked like a fishing hat.

"We were going to hopefully get a handle on it before we got much further," Assistant Police Chief Kevin Robinson said of the decision to go public.

But it wasn't just sexual assaults. Early on, the robberies started, too.


Nov. 3
Incidents to date: Nine.

Victims: A 61-year-old man and a 29-year-old woman.

Attacker: Unknown.

A man with dreadlocks and a fishing hat walked into a lingerie shop on North 32nd Street.

"I'm a little nervous," he told the woman behind the counter. She didn't think much of it. A lot of guys say that when they're buying lingerie or sex toys.

Owner Henry Loeb, who was not present during the robbery but arrived shortly afterward, said the man pulled a gun and ran out of the store with $720. Less than 10 minutes later, the same man reportedly abducted a woman from a grocery-store parking lot across the street and sexually assaulted her. She had been putting clothes into a donation bin when she was taken in her own car.

Four days later, on Nov. 7, a Black man with a wig and a fishing hat robbed a Mexican grill, a pizza place next door to it and four people standing in the parking lot at 32nd Street and Thomas Road. Police reports say he made off with $463 and fired a round into the air as he fled on foot.

By this time, police already had cast a wide net, looking at every robbery involving a Black man with a gun to see if they might possibly be linked and if any could provide valuable clues. They were looking at sexual assaults, too, and noticed similarities between the Nov. 3 attack and the three previous ones, even though the rapist apparently had moved from south Phoenix to east Phoenix.

Police again released a description of the rapist, noting his shoulder-length hair was possibly a wig. He had round plastic glasses.


Dec. 12
Incidents to date: 14.

Victim: A 39-year-old woman.

Attacker: Unknown.

Tina Washington regularly took the bus to work. She was a preschool teacher and a mother of two. She had told co-workers that two men had been harassing her as she waited at the bus stop at 40th Street and Southern Avenue to catch a ride home to Tempe.

Just before 7 p.m., a witness heard shots and saw a man with a drawn gun standing over a woman behind a fast-food chicken restaurant and a gas-station convenience store at Southern Avenue and 40th Street. Washington had been shot in the head. Another bullet had ripped through her hand as if she was trying to protect herself.

Washington was the Baseline Killer's second murder victim, although police didn't know it yet. Georgia Thompson, 19, had been shot in the head Sept. 8 in the parking lot of her Tempe apartment complex. It would be 10 months later and seven months after Washington's death before police forensically linked Thompson's murder to the Baseline Killer.

In January, though, police sifting through evidence began to suspect that Washington's murderer might be the same man who had committed the three robberies on Nov. 7. While forensic evidence seemed to link the crimes, there was nothing that conclusively pointed to one attacker.

A day after Washington's murder, another woman was robbed. Then three months passed with no similar crimes.


March 15
Incidents to date: 16.

Victims: A 23-year-old man and a 20-year-old woman.

Attacker: Unknown.

Chao "George" Chou and Liliana Sanchez-Cabrera left their place of employment, Yoshi's restaurant, at 24th Street and Indian School Road, at about 10:30 p.m. on March 14. Chou, a Taiwanese national described by his boss as a "very nice and polite young man," had been working at the restaurant about four years. Sanchez-Cabrera had just completed her first shift .

They left together in Chou's vehicle.

At 8:02 the next morning, employees of another fast-food restaurant across the street and down the street at 22nd Street and Indian School called police to report finding a body in a car in the parking lot. It was Sanchez-Cabrera's. She had been shot in the head at close range.

Nearly four hours later, Chou's body was found in an alley about a mile away. He also had been shot in the head.

March 29
Incidents to date: 18.

Victim: A 26-year-old woman.

Attacker: Unknown.

Glenn Notsch, who runs a swimming-pool service from a home on 24th Street about a mile south of Thomas Road, parked his car in the back of the business eight days or so after Chou and Sanchez-Cabrera were found dead and noticed drag marks in the gravel and patches of blood on the stones. He called police, who looked around and found nothing.

The next week, on March 29, Notsch noticed a strong odor when he came to work. His dog insisted on nosing through a pile of debris between the house used by the business and a storage shed. Notsch moved some boards.

"I remember seeing an arm and a leg with no clothing on them. And I just ran out of there," he said.

It was the body of Kristin Nicole Gibbons. She also had been shot in the head, and her body was badly decomposed.

Police say evidence indicated that the three murders were connected and that all three were linked to Washington's death.

A small task force formed in April, and police prepared to go public with the information linking all the murders and the three robberies.

But before they did, a man in a latex Halloween mask abducted a woman in a car from a parking lot on 32nd Street at Thomas, right in front of the Mexican grill and pizza joint that had been robbed in November, and sexually assaulted her at gunpoint.

The May 1 attack "told us a number of things that we needed to know," Sgt. Andy Hill said. But Hill would not be more specific.

What was clear was that police then knew they had a serial killer and robber who looked to be the rapist who had first attacked last August. They went public on May 5 with a list of 18 violent crimes they believed to be linked.

The composite remained the same: a Black man with dreadlocks and a fishing hat. Police said it was the best description they had. The attacker likely wore disguises and committed his crimes after dark. They appealed for tips.

"We don't want anyone else to be harmed," Robinson, the assistant police chief, said at the time.


June 29
Incidents to date: 20.

Victim: A 37-year-old woman.

Attacker: Unknown.

Carmen Miranda, a mother of two, went to a carwash at 29th Street and Thomas Road, just a few hundred yards from parking lot where the November robberies and the May assault took place. It was 9:30 p.m. She washed her car and was at the vacuuming station, standing by the driver's side. The car door was open. Miranda was talking on a cellphone.

A man approached from the passenger side, said James Garnand, who owns the carwash and saw the attack on surveillance video afterward. Miranda told the friend she was talking to on her cellphone that someone had just asked for her change.

Then, according to Garnand, the man charged around the car, grabbed Miranda and threw her into the back seat.

As word spread by telephone that Miranda had been kidnapped from the carwash, her friend Leybi Muñoz, 33, rushed there, arriving at about 11 p.m. Miranda's family was already there. Police were putting up crime-scene tape.

"They took us to the apartments alongside the carwash," Muñoz said. "We waited there until about 4 or 5 in the morning. That's when they told us they had the car with a dead body in it. That's all they said."

Miranda's body was found behind a barbershop about 100 yards away. She had been shot in the head.

The surveillance video showed her vehicle exiting the carwash's parking lot, but it did not give a clear view of the attacker.

Police called it a "blitz attack."

That was nearly four weeks ago. Police and residents alike wait and wonder if he will strike again and where.

Today
Total victims: Six killed; 11 sexually assaulted; 22 robbed.

Attacker: Unknown.

 

20060711: Valley school taking safety precautions against serial killer AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News
With the serial killer we've come to know as the Baseline Rapist still on the loose in Phoenix, businesses, homeowners and one Valley school are taking measures to guard against the killer. These attacks dating back to August 2005 have forced folks in nearby homes and businesses to "shutter-up" and hunker down. One of those neighborhoods is at 31st Street and Thomas Road where a school is taking every precaution to keep a killer out. Being cautious has become a priority for the teachers at the Starshine Academy Charter School near 31st Street and Thomas Road, so the school went on so-called lock down. The school has a policy that no one is allowed to work alone, so there has to be someone else there in order for someone to be in the building. School is not in session until August 7th and if the killer is not caught by the time school starts they will take necessary precautions to ensure safety. And until the Baseline Rapist is caught the gates at the school will remain locked.
 

20060630: Phoenix woman may be serial killer’s victim AZ Phoenix Serial Killer News
A serial rapist-killer appears to have struck again in Phoenix. Police believe there are connections between four unsolved homicides and the discovery of a woman's body Thursday night in Phoenix.

"We're almost certain it's going to be the same guy," police spokesman detective Tony Morales said.

The woman, a 37-year-old Phoenix resident, was kidnapped while washing her car around 9 p.m. at 2924 E. Thomas Road. A surveillance videotape taken at the car wash shows she was approached by a man, then forced into her vehicle.

A family member, unable to contact the woman on her cell phone, went to the car wash and found an object on the ground that came from her car.

Police responding to the 911 call found the woman dead in her 1996 Ford Crown Victoria behind a nearby business. Police would not provide details on how she was killed.

From the surveillance tape, the suspect is described as a tall, thin man wearing a long-sleeved shirt, jeans and a beanie cap.

Police say the same man now may have been responsible for as many as five homicides, seven sexual assaults and several robberies since December.

 


Copyright 1995-2006 by Elisabeth Wetsch
spacer spacer
spacer