serial killer news 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 more topics
   
  HARDY Anthony ... ... Serial Killer UK ... ... ... ...
aka ... ... ...
... : ... ... ... ...
Verdict/Urteil:
 
Serial Killer
 
...

20050921: Report clears health experts who freed serial killer Camden Town Serial Killer News
AN INQUIRY this week cleared mental health bosses who released serial killer Anthony Hardy from hospital - even though they were warned several times that he posed a serious risk to the public.

A report issued on Tuesday revealed that Hardy - dubbed the Camden Ripper - was released as an in-patient at St Luke's Hospital in Woodside Avenue, Muswell Hill, despite repeated warnings that he was dangerous.

Just six weeks later - in December 2002 - Hardy murdered two women, Elizabeth Valad, 29, and Bridgette Maclennan, 34, in his flat on the College Place Estate, Camden Town.

He was sentenced to life in November 2003 after he pleaded guilty to those murders and also to the killing of 38-year-old Sally White in January 2002.

The report shows that a lay panel of mental health experts deemed Hardy suitable for release in November despite the warnings from psychiatrists.

An assessment made in 2002 stated: "There is a high risk of violence to members of the public.

"Women with whom he is in a relationship may be at particular risk."

And a line in the report reveals that members of the team dealing with Hardy's treatment in 2002 believed the risk to others was just as high after seven months in hospital as it had been when he was first admitted.

But hospital managers ignored the warning signs and gave Hardy permission to return home.

Hardy had a long history of mental illness, stretching back to 1981 when he admitted to the attempted murder of his then wife.

But despite a catalogue of violent behaviour linked to his mental state, the panel who conducted the inquiry concluded that Hardy's illness was purely "coincidental" to the murders, and cleared mental health bosses of blame.

Robert Robinson, who chaired the inquiry, said: "Our assessment of the evidence is that neither in January 2002 nor in December 2002 was Mr Hardy actively mentally ill.

"His guilty pleas amounted to an admission that he knew what he was doing and had acted intentionally.

"There is no evidence that his responsibility was diminished. We therefore conclude that his mental illness did not contribute to whatever led him to kill three people."

He added: "It could not have been predicted that Mr Hardy would commit murder after being discharged from hospital."

Erville Miller, the chief executive of the Camden and Islington Mental Health and Social Care Trust, said: "I believe this is a landmark report because it finds that the man committed the murders, not the mental illness.

"Anthony Hardy was a very bad man whose crimes appear to be sexually motivated and mental illness played no part in them.

"After the event we can benefit from hindsight but the murders could not have been foreseen."

He added: "We welcome the report's findings and recommendations and have already made major changes to our service to ensure this does not happen again."

The murders of Ms Valad and Ms Maclennan were discovered after a tramp found the severed remains of two female bodies while rummaging through bin liners outside Hardy's flat.

Hardy had already been arrested on suspicion of the murder of Ms White before his admittance to St Luke's but the charges were dropped when a coroner ruled Ms White had died from heart complications.

The coroner's verdict was revised after Hardy's confession of guilt.
 

20050225: Serial killer's victim to stand as MP London Serial Killer News
A woman's two year campaign to reopen the case of a serial killer has led her to consider standing in the forthcoming general elections.

On 13 December 2002, mother-of-two Tina Harvey had just qualified as a masseur when she claims Anthony Hardy, dubbed the Camden ripper, raped and tried to kill her.

Hardy was given three life sentences in November 2003 for murdering three prostitutes to satisfy his "depraved and perverted" sexual cravings.

After the case the Metropolitan Police confirmed that Hardy had been investigated for three other rapes but there was insufficient evidence to bring the case against him.

'Brick wall'

Ms Harvey was one of those cases and has since been battling to see him convicted for the alleged attack.

"Over the last two years I feel like I've been bashing my head against a brick wall," she told BBC News.

"I've tried the legal process and the political process and got no where, now I think it's personal."

The 40-year-old grandmother has said she wants to stand against David Lammy MP in the Tottenham North seat.

Mr Lammy is in charge of the department of constitutional affairs, which grants legal aid to victims of crime.

Ms Harvey has had legal aid to get her case reopened refused twice and said standing against him would help to highlight her situation.

"I know I don't have much of a chance but I'm ready to take on the challenge and to take my case to another level," she said.

Ms Harvey, who will stand as an independent candidate, visited residents in Tottenham to find out what changes they want to see in their area.

"My main priority will be calls to reform the criminal justice system to enable victims of crime to get better access to justice," she said.

She is also trying to rally support for a 10-minute bill in the House of Commons.

The former glamour model first got involved in politics when her son was being bullied at school in 1997.

She eventually removed him from the school and secured funding so he could be taught at home - he is due to go to university this year.

Ms Harvey then stood in the 2001 general elections in Northampton calling for education reforms.

The mother-of-two said since the alleged attack she has "devoted all her time" fighting for legal aid to get her case heard.

'Case dropped'

She claims her evidence in the case along with another alleged victim led the police to broaden their search in the hunt to find the bodies of Hardy's victims.

"When it came to the court case the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) decided that because he had denied the attack on me but admitted killing three women, my case was dropped," she said.

A CPS spokeswoman confirmed that they did receive a police file in relation to Ms Harvey and three other alleged victims with charges of rape and indecent assault.

"After lengthy consultation with various bodies we decided that there was insufficient evidence for a realistic conviction," she said.

The spokeswoman added Hardy was due to go on trial for the attacks on 25 November but on the same day changed his plea to guilty in relation to three charges of murder.

A recent High Court hearing upheld a decision not to hold a public inquiry into why he was released from a psychiatric hospital prior to the attacks.

Ms Harvey interrupted those proceedings to show her disgust at the ruling.

"This case is about the dead victims of the Camden Ripper, but I am a living victim and not getting justice in our courts," she said.

 

20050125: Sex killer inquiry is dismissed London Serial Killer News
The High Court has upheld a decision not to hold a public inquiry into how a serial killer in north London was released from a psychiatric hospital. Anthony Hardy, of Camden, was jailed in November 2003 after admitting killing Sally White, Elizabeth Valad and Bridgette MacClennan.

Ms Valad's family were seeking a judicial review into how he was freed.

Friday's ruling sparked an outburst from Tina Harvey, 40, from Northampton, who claims Hardy raped her.

Private investigation

She said she had been refused legal aid to challenge a decision not to prosecute Hardy for allegedly raping her just weeks before he killed two of his victims.

Ms Harvey interrupted the judgment, being given by Mr Justice Bennett, and shouted: "This case is about a Camden Ripper dead victim, but I am a living victim and not getting justice in your courts."

She said: "He attacked me in the same way as he attacked his murder victims - choking me, suffocating me so that I could not breathe while he sexually assaulted me."

Last June the Health Secretary decided not to hold a public inquiry but leave the probe into how Hardy was left free to kill to a private investigation set up by the North Central London Strategic Health Authority.

The judge ruled the Health Secretary had been entitled to conclude that the health authority inquiry, together with an inquest which was still to be held, would be sufficient to satisfy the family's human rights.

Natural causes

Hardy was released from St Luke's Hospital, London, in November 2002 after doctors said he posed no danger to the public.

But by then, he had already murdered his first victim. Sally White's body was discovered at Hardy's flat in January 2002 but her death was put down to natural causes.

One month after his release from hospital he lured Miss MacClennan and Miss Valad to his flat and murdered them.

He was arrested after their dismembered remains were found in bin bags near his home.
 

20050921: Report clears health experts who freed serial killer Camden Town Serial Killer News
AN INQUIRY this week cleared mental health bosses who released serial killer Anthony Hardy from hospital - even though they were warned several times that he posed a serious risk to the public.

A report issued on Tuesday revealed that Hardy - dubbed the Camden Ripper - was released as an in-patient at St Luke's Hospital in Woodside Avenue, Muswell Hill, despite repeated warnings that he was dangerous.

Just six weeks later - in December 2002 - Hardy murdered two women, Elizabeth Valad, 29, and Bridgette Maclennan, 34, in his flat on the College Place Estate, Camden Town.

He was sentenced to life in November 2003 after he pleaded guilty to those murders and also to the killing of 38-year-old Sally White in January 2002.

The report shows that a lay panel of mental health experts deemed Hardy suitable for release in November despite the warnings from psychiatrists.

An assessment made in 2002 stated: "There is a high risk of violence to members of the public.

"Women with whom he is in a relationship may be at particular risk."

And a line in the report reveals that members of the team dealing with Hardy's treatment in 2002 believed the risk to others was just as high after seven months in hospital as it had been when he was first admitted.

But hospital managers ignored the warning signs and gave Hardy permission to return home.

Hardy had a long history of mental illness, stretching back to 1981 when he admitted to the attempted murder of his then wife.

But despite a catalogue of violent behaviour linked to his mental state, the panel who conducted the inquiry concluded that Hardy's illness was purely "coincidental" to the murders, and cleared mental health bosses of blame.

Robert Robinson, who chaired the inquiry, said: "Our assessment of the evidence is that neither in January 2002 nor in December 2002 was Mr Hardy actively mentally ill.

"His guilty pleas amounted to an admission that he knew what he was doing and had acted intentionally.

"There is no evidence that his responsibility was diminished. We therefore conclude that his mental illness did not contribute to whatever led him to kill three people."

He added: "It could not have been predicted that Mr Hardy would commit murder after being discharged from hospital."

Erville Miller, the chief executive of the Camden and Islington Mental Health and Social Care Trust, said: "I believe this is a landmark report because it finds that the man committed the murders, not the mental illness.

"Anthony Hardy was a very bad man whose crimes appear to be sexually motivated and mental illness played no part in them.

"After the event we can benefit from hindsight but the murders could not have been foreseen."

He added: "We welcome the report's findings and recommendations and have already made major changes to our service to ensure this does not happen again."

The murders of Ms Valad and Ms Maclennan were discovered after a tramp found the severed remains of two female bodies while rummaging through bin liners outside Hardy's flat.

Hardy had already been arrested on suspicion of the murder of Ms White before his admittance to St Luke's but the charges were dropped when a coroner ruled Ms White had died from heart complications.

The coroner's verdict was revised after Hardy's confession of guilt.
 

20050225: Serial killer's victim to stand as MP London Serial Killer News
A woman's two year campaign to reopen the case of a serial killer has led her to consider standing in the forthcoming general elections.

On 13 December 2002, mother-of-two Tina Harvey had just qualified as a masseur when she claims Anthony Hardy, dubbed the Camden ripper, raped and tried to kill her.

Hardy was given three life sentences in November 2003 for murdering three prostitutes to satisfy his "depraved and perverted" sexual cravings.

After the case the Metropolitan Police confirmed that Hardy had been investigated for three other rapes but there was insufficient evidence to bring the case against him.

'Brick wall'

Ms Harvey was one of those cases and has since been battling to see him convicted for the alleged attack.

"Over the last two years I feel like I've been bashing my head against a brick wall," she told BBC News.

"I've tried the legal process and the political process and got no where, now I think it's personal."

The 40-year-old grandmother has said she wants to stand against David Lammy MP in the Tottenham North seat.

Mr Lammy is in charge of the department of constitutional affairs, which grants legal aid to victims of crime.

Ms Harvey has had legal aid to get her case reopened refused twice and said standing against him would help to highlight her situation.

"I know I don't have much of a chance but I'm ready to take on the challenge and to take my case to another level," she said.

Ms Harvey, who will stand as an independent candidate, visited residents in Tottenham to find out what changes they want to see in their area.

"My main priority will be calls to reform the criminal justice system to enable victims of crime to get better access to justice," she said.

She is also trying to rally support for a 10-minute bill in the House of Commons.

The former glamour model first got involved in politics when her son was being bullied at school in 1997.

She eventually removed him from the school and secured funding so he could be taught at home - he is due to go to university this year.

Ms Harvey then stood in the 2001 general elections in Northampton calling for education reforms.

The mother-of-two said since the alleged attack she has "devoted all her time" fighting for legal aid to get her case heard.

'Case dropped'

She claims her evidence in the case along with another alleged victim led the police to broaden their search in the hunt to find the bodies of Hardy's victims.

"When it came to the court case the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) decided that because he had denied the attack on me but admitted killing three women, my case was dropped," she said.

A CPS spokeswoman confirmed that they did receive a police file in relation to Ms Harvey and three other alleged victims with charges of rape and indecent assault.

"After lengthy consultation with various bodies we decided that there was insufficient evidence for a realistic conviction," she said.

The spokeswoman added Hardy was due to go on trial for the attacks on 25 November but on the same day changed his plea to guilty in relation to three charges of murder.

A recent High Court hearing upheld a decision not to hold a public inquiry into why he was released from a psychiatric hospital prior to the attacks.

Ms Harvey interrupted those proceedings to show her disgust at the ruling.

"This case is about the dead victims of the Camden Ripper, but I am a living victim and not getting justice in our courts," she said.

 

20050125: Sex killer inquiry is dismissed London Serial Killer News
The High Court has upheld a decision not to hold a public inquiry into how a serial killer in north London was released from a psychiatric hospital. Anthony Hardy, of Camden, was jailed in November 2003 after admitting killing Sally White, Elizabeth Valad and Bridgette MacClennan.

Ms Valad's family were seeking a judicial review into how he was freed.

Friday's ruling sparked an outburst from Tina Harvey, 40, from Northampton, who claims Hardy raped her.

Private investigation

She said she had been refused legal aid to challenge a decision not to prosecute Hardy for allegedly raping her just weeks before he killed two of his victims.

Ms Harvey interrupted the judgment, being given by Mr Justice Bennett, and shouted: "This case is about a Camden Ripper dead victim, but I am a living victim and not getting justice in your courts."

She said: "He attacked me in the same way as he attacked his murder victims - choking me, suffocating me so that I could not breathe while he sexually assaulted me."

Last June the Health Secretary decided not to hold a public inquiry but leave the probe into how Hardy was left free to kill to a private investigation set up by the North Central London Strategic Health Authority.

The judge ruled the Health Secretary had been entitled to conclude that the health authority inquiry, together with an inquest which was still to be held, would be sufficient to satisfy the family's human rights.

Natural causes

Hardy was released from St Luke's Hospital, London, in November 2002 after doctors said he posed no danger to the public.

But by then, he had already murdered his first victim. Sally White's body was discovered at Hardy's flat in January 2002 but her death was put down to natural causes.

One month after his release from hospital he lured Miss MacClennan and Miss Valad to his flat and murdered them.

He was arrested after their dismembered remains were found in bin bags near his home.
 


Copyright 1995-2005 by Elisabeth Wetsch
spacer spacer
spacer