serial killers by name [y] amazon
     
  YUKL Charles William *1935 +1982 USA ... ... ... 2
aka , Yogi FRIETAG, Greenwich Village Murderer 1966 1974 CA
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Charles Yukl was born in 1935 in Baltimore to Czech immigrant family. His parents were both musicians. They divorced when he was seven. His father, taking custody of the children, moved them to California. Its difficult to understand why he was awarded custody; the father was a brute. Charles was beaten regularly and locked in a closet. By the age of nine, the boy was an arsonist. He had a high average intelligence, IQ 108, and could type 100 words a minute. He had a serious stutter. Charles had been reading sheet music since the age of four and seemed a natural for a musical career. By 1968, he was playing clubs and bars in the Village and had moved to Waverly Place. He began placing ads as a piano and voice teacher. His show business name was Yogi Frietag, but people called him Charlie. He walked around the city with a movie camera, pretending to film women on the street. Looking at women through the lens of a camera, he said, controlled his stutter. In the early 1970s, he posed as a graduate student and stood in Washington Square Park passing out questionnaires for his thesis. The surveys asked for names and phone numbers. He asked only women to fill out an SASE in case of follow-up questions. A state parole officer knew Yukls address was 120 Waverly Place as he watched a story on the 11:00 news. It was August 20, 1974, and a schoolteacher who lived at 118 Waverly Place complained of a leak coming through the ceiling of her top floor apartment. She and the building superintendent went up to investigate the source of the leak and found the nude body of a young woman. The police turned the body over and found imprints of a 2-1/2 by 4 inch rectangle with 3 circular holes in the flesh of her back. The parole officer knew Yukl as the killer in 1966 of Suzanne Reynolds, a secretary, an aspiring actress, a singer. She had gone to keep an appointment with a vocal coach named Yogi Frietag. His apartment was on East 28th Street. He strangled her with a black necktie, screaming all the while, Youre a goddamn slob. He sodomized and mutilated her dead body downstairs in a vacant apartment. Taking his dog out for a walk, he tossed Suzannes belongings into a trashcan. Yukl, a part-time building manager, then took his wife to show her the dead body he had discovered in the empty apartment. The police noticed bloodstains on his shoes. They later found more bloodstains on his underwear and genitals. In court in 1968, Charles Yukl answered the prosecutor, Yes, sir, I did strangle Miss Suzanne Reynolds. Yukl was in Sing Sing from 1969 to 1971. He was moved to the minimum-security facility at Wallkill, where he was a model prisoner. He rewrote prison pamphlets, reorganized the photography department, led the choir and prison band. Yukl was paroled in June of 1973, termed no longer mentally ill. By October, he began his stint passing out fake questionnaires to NYU co-eds in Washington Square Park. In January of 1974, he dreamed of killing a woman and of being swallowed up by his wife during sex. This was not a new dream. Yukls wife eventually divorced him for sexual abandonment. They'd had sex ten times in their 14 years of marriage. He dreamed of being swallowed up when he had sex with his wife. Karin Schlegel was a virgin of 23, an editorial assistant for McGraw-Hill. She studied acting a couple of times a week at the Strasberg Institute near Union Square. Early in 1974 she left her job to devote herself to becoming an actress. Taking a waitress job, she moved into a tiny studio on Minetta Lane. It was small, but it had a wood-burning fireplace. And it was in Greenwich Village, on a charming street, diagonally across Sixth Avenue from Waverly Place. In July, she went on her first audition after answering a casting call in Show Business. When the filmmaker called to tell her she had the part, he told her shed have to rehearse with him nights for a couple of weeks and made an appointment for their first session. A friend she was rehearsing with advised her not to go. The sessions were for 9 oclock at night at his apartment at 120 Waverly Place. Once he had her there, Yukl strangled Karin Schlegel with a black necktie, breaking her neck. He couldn't stop hitting her. When she was dead, he removed her clothes. He kept on beating her naked, dead body. He was about to begin cutting, when his wife called to say she was on her way home. He put Karins body under the mattress and he and his wife slept on her corpse all night. The base of the Yukl marriage bed was a worktable with small rectangular metal plates that had holes in them. In the morning, after his wife left for work, he took Karins body up to the roof and dumped it. He dumped her belongings in a trash basket. He came home for lunch and took the table back to work with him. He left the mattress on the floor. It was the 1970s; people slept on mattresses on the floor. After watching the television news broadcast about the body on the roof on Waverly Place, Yukl's parole officer called his friend in the 13th Precinct, Homicide Detective Donald Baeszler. When Yukl was arrested for the murder of Karin Schlegel, Detective Baeszler took him to the Tombs, while Yukls wife was interviewed at the 13th precinct. When he heard his wife was with the police, Yukl grew disturbed and blurted out a spontaneous confession. He said that hed already gotten rid of all the evidence, The neck tie, her clothing, her pocketbook, and the table. The table that had made the rectangular 2-1/2 by 4 inch imprint in the cold flesh of Karin Schlegel. There was no trial; Yukl pled guilty. He was sentenced to 15 years to life, with parole eligibility in 1989. A bureaucratic error reduced the sentence by five years, with parole a probability on June 7, 1984. His wife had already divorced him by 1982, for sexual abandonment, when Charles Yukl hung himself.

Charles Yukl was born in 1935 in Baltimore to Czech immigrant family. His parents were both musicians. They divorced when he was seven. His father, taking custody of the children, moved them to California. Its difficult to understand why he was awarded custody; the father was a brute. Charles was beaten regularly and locked in a closet. By the age of nine, the boy was an arsonist. He had a high average intelligence, IQ 108, and could type 100 words a minute. He had a serious stutter. Charles had been reading sheet music since the age of four and seemed a natural for a musical career. By 1968, he was playing clubs and bars in the Village and had moved to Waverly Place. He began placing ads as a piano and voice teacher. His show business name was Yogi Frietag, but people called him Charlie. He walked around the city with a movie camera, pretending to film women on the street. Looking at women through the lens of a camera, he said, controlled his stutter. In the early 1970s, he posed as a graduate student and stood in Washington Square Park passing out questionnaires for his thesis. The surveys asked for names and phone numbers. He asked only women to fill out an SASE in case of follow-up questions. A state parole officer knew Yukls address was 120 Waverly Place as he watched a story on the 11:00 news. It was August 20, 1974, and a schoolteacher who lived at 118 Waverly Place complained of a leak coming through the ceiling of her top floor apartment. She and the building superintendent went up to investigate the source of the leak and found the nude body of a young woman. The police turned the body over and found imprints of a 2-1/2 by 4 inch rectangle with 3 circular holes in the flesh of her back. The parole officer knew Yukl as the killer in 1966 of Suzanne Reynolds, a secretary, an aspiring actress, a singer. She had gone to keep an appointment with a vocal coach named Yogi Frietag. His apartment was on East 28th Street. He strangled her with a black necktie, screaming all the while, Youre a goddamn slob. He sodomized and mutilated her dead body downstairs in a vacant apartment. Taking his dog out for a walk, he tossed Suzannes belongings into a trashcan. Yukl, a part-time building manager, then took his wife to show her the dead body he had discovered in the empty apartment. The police noticed bloodstains on his shoes. They later found more bloodstains on his underwear and genitals. In court in 1968, Charles Yukl answered the prosecutor, Yes, sir, I did strangle Miss Suzanne Reynolds. Yukl was in Sing Sing from 1969 to 1971. He was moved to the minimum-security facility at Wallkill, where he was a model prisoner. He rewrote prison pamphlets, reorganized the photography department, led the choir and prison band. Yukl was paroled in June of 1973, termed no longer mentally ill. By October, he began his stint passing out fake questionnaires to NYU co-eds in Washington Square Park. In January of 1974, he dreamed of killing a woman and of being swallowed up by his wife during sex. This was not a new dream. Yukls wife eventually divorced him for sexual abandonment. They'd had sex ten times in their 14 years of marriage. He dreamed of being swallowed up when he had sex with his wife. Karin Schlegel was a virgin of 23, an editorial assistant for McGraw-Hill. She studied acting a couple of times a week at the Strasberg Institute near Union Square. Early in 1974 she left her job to devote herself to becoming an actress. Taking a waitress job, she moved into a tiny studio on Minetta Lane. It was small, but it had a wood-burning fireplace. And it was in Greenwich Village, on a charming street, diagonally across Sixth Avenue from Waverly Place. In July, she went on her first audition after answering a casting call in Show Business. When the filmmaker called to tell her she had the part, he told her shed have to rehearse with him nights for a couple of weeks and made an appointment for their first session. A friend she was rehearsing with advised her not to go. The sessions were for 9 oclock at night at his apartment at 120 Waverly Place. Once he had her there, Yukl strangled Karin Schlegel with a black necktie, breaking her neck. He couldn't stop hitting her. When she was dead, he removed her clothes. He kept on beating her naked, dead body. He was about to begin cutting, when his wife called to say she was on her way home. He put Karins body under the mattress and he and his wife slept on her corpse all night. The base of the Yukl marriage bed was a worktable with small rectangular metal plates that had holes in them. In the morning, after his wife left for work, he took Karins body up to the roof and dumped it. He dumped her belongings in a trash basket. He came home for lunch and took the table back to work with him. He left the mattress on the floor. It was the 1970s; people slept on mattresses on the floor. After watching the television news broadcast about the body on the roof on Waverly Place, Yukl's parole officer called his friend in the 13th Precinct, Homicide Detective Donald Baeszler. When Yukl was arrested for the murder of Karin Schlegel, Detective Baeszler took him to the Tombs, while Yukls wife was interviewed at the 13th precinct. When he heard his wife was with the police, Yukl grew disturbed and blurted out a spontaneous confession. He said that hed already gotten rid of all the evidence, The neck tie, her clothing, her pocketbook, and the table. The table that had made the rectangular 2-1/2 by 4 inch imprint in the cold flesh of Karin Schlegel. There was no trial; Yukl pled guilty. He was sentenced to 15 years to life, with parole eligibility in 1989. A bureaucratic error reduced the sentence by five years, with parole a probability on June 7, 1984. His wife had already divorced him by 1982, for sexual abandonment, when Charles Yukl hung himself.
Copyright 1995-2005 by Elisabeth Wetsch
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